This Means War by Mary Jennings

Mary Jennings

Broadjam Artist: Mary Jennings
Song: This Means War

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
Jonathan Weiss (Music Supervisor, A&R)

Pro General Comments: Chorus is recognizable and overall has noticeable sectional contrast between verse and chorus sections. Verse and chorus melody are pretty similar in tone in terms of being in the same dynamic range and melodic structure. Chorus is pretty strident sounding in terms of the lyrics themselves (this means war) and the delivery which is somewhat aggressive in tonality. Pretty innovative background vocal arrangement which has the ability to soften up the more aggressively styled lead vocal phrasing and overall tone. Instrumental track and overall production is contemporary sounding and has current sounding percussion, bass and keyboard samples being used. Bridge section also helps to break up the verse and chorus sections. Vocal rhythm during verses is pretty staccato sounding which also moves it towards a more aggressive and familiar sounding style.

Quote From Pro: Contemporary sounding arrangement and confident sounding vocal delivery make this song an appealing relationship based song that has an overall current sound.

Disconnected (II) by Mary P. Carter

Mary P. Carter

Broadjam Artist: Mary P. Carter
Song: Disconnected (II)

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
Malik Williams (Producer, Artist, Engineer, Composer)

Pro General Comments: Hi Mary!Thanks so much for the opportunity to review your work! First off I'll say.. Nice song! It was a bit of a throwback for me... and that's a good thing. I chose Pop as a gene/category (because there's only one choice, but I can hear that classic R&B soul influence in your voice as well. Your soft, but confident delivery and tone resembles that of the classic Epic Records singer, Lulu! I was immediately reminded of her performance of the classic song, To Sir With Love. I also hear a hint of Mary Wilson of that same era.The lyrics are pretty straight forward and your melodic progressions blend well with the arrangement, that is well done.My constructive comments are Overall, I feel this song could use some additional instrumentation and production, although, the recording of the instruments, vocal sound, and mix is clean. The acoustic drums and timing is tight, but I kept wanting to hear the bass line move more in the pocket to drive the track and groove more. Even having the natural bass sound sustain as it would between notes with natural fingering techniques. That would give this track more of an R&B groove. I'd say, the same goes for the piano performance. Just for fun, you could add some guitar wah-wah to really funk it up! It would add a little more coloration to the mid-range of this song to better bridge your vocals with the lower frequencies in the mix.Again, I'm just lending some production ideas to consider, be it this one or a future project.Nevertheless, the title and chorus of this song gets the message across. That is extremely important if you're considering any film and tv placements. I hope these comments and constructive advice is helpful... Keep writing, and good luck with this song! All the best!!

Quote From Pro: Mary P. Carter's voice is pure and authentic. Her soft delivery and tone resembles that of the classic Epic Records singer, Lulu!

Who’s Gonna Turn On A Light (Selsky/Dunkle) by Randal Dunkle

Randal Dunkle

Broadjam Artist: Randal Dunkle
Song: Who's Gonna Turn On A Light (Selsky/Dunkle)

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
Tirk Wilder (Songwriter, Performer)

Pro General Comments: Randal,First of all I have to say that reviewing any song that has Jesus uplifted in it is very hard for me. How can I say anything negative about it? It is in service to my Lord and Savior. THAT fact alone makes it a worthy effort.I don't often get songs that rock this HARD, either. Shame hardly anybody sends me this genre.My only suggestions would be for you to consider these thoughts:In the chorus, When you come to the words "about Christ", the melody goes down. The words also have the same meter as every other word in the line.I would have those words go WAY HIGHER than anything else in the line, and I would stretch them out almost to half note size. They need to be EMPHASIZED. HE is the reason for the song, and I believe His Name should BLATANTLY stand out somehow.I would also say that I am not crazy about the lyric in the second verse AFTER the phrase "Lord, we love you day and night". I believe you can do a little better than what you have following that phrase.The reason I say that is that your rhyme pattern in the first verse, "lights" rhymes with "tonight". In the second verse, "night" does not rhyme with "back", and your rhyme pattern is broken. The second line "but help us not to simply set aside what's going on outside" seems a little weak to me. From everything else I see here, I can see that YOU can do better than that.The only other thing I might mention is that the effects you have on the lead vocal might be a tad heavy. The reason I say that is that the lyrics were a bit difficult to understand with that much reverb and delay on them.Hey, this song is about HIM. Let's make sure that even the casual listener gets that, right?Rock on, buddy. TESTIFY!

Quote From Pro: This artist could rock the Christian world!

Who’s Gonna Turn On A Light (Selsky/Dunkle) by Randal Dunkle

Randal Dunkle

Broadjam Artist: Randal Dunkle
Song: Who's Gonna Turn On A Light (Selsky/Dunkle)

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
Tirk Wilder (Songwriter, Performer)

Pro General Comments: Randal,First of all I have to say that reviewing any song that has Jesus uplifted in it is very hard for me. How can I say anything negative about it? It is in service to my Lord and Savior. THAT fact alone makes it a worthy effort.I don't often get songs that rock this HARD, either. Shame hardly anybody sends me this genre.My only suggestions would be for you to consider these thoughts:In the chorus, When you come to the words "about Christ", the melody goes down. The words also have the same meter as every other word in the line.I would have those words go WAY HIGHER than anything else in the line, and I would stretch them out almost to half note size. They need to be EMPHASIZED. HE is the reason for the song, and I believe His Name should BLATANTLY stand out somehow.I would also say that I am not crazy about the lyric in the second verse AFTER the phrase "Lord, we love you day and night". I believe you can do a little better than what you have following that phrase.The reason I say that is that your rhyme pattern in the first verse, "lights" rhymes with "tonight". In the second verse, "night" does not rhyme with "back", and your rhyme pattern is broken. The second line "but help us not to simply set aside what's going on outside" seems a little weak to me. From everything else I see here, I can see that YOU can do better than that.The only other thing I might mention is that the effects you have on the lead vocal might be a tad heavy. The reason I say that is that the lyrics were a bit difficult to understand with that much reverb and delay on them.Hey, this song is about HIM. Let's make sure that even the casual listener gets that, right?Rock on, buddy. TESTIFY!

Quote From Pro: This artist could rock the Christian world!

Everything is Anything by Justin Seegert Music

Justin Seegert Music

Broadjam Artist: Justin Seegert Music
Song: Everything is Anything

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
A.J. Gundell (Songwriter, Composer, Music Supervisor, Producer)

Pro General Comments: Probably the most captivating and enjoyable part of "Everything Is Anything" is the most important part of all: the hook. The words come out the the singer's mouth like a fusillade of gunfire notes--super-singable, memorable, repetitive, and hook'y. The fact that this is also the chorus and title of the song makes for a very promising beginning for this indie alt-folk rocker.From there, I think some deeper lyrical analysis and critique would be helpful. First, the lyric begs the question of... "okay, but, what's the point?" If the answer comes in the next line, "everything don't mean nothing to me," then my question as both reviewer and listener is--then why are you singing about it? And I don't really believe the singer, that none of this means anything. The verses say "I was cold, and you made me warm" and "I was old, and you made me young." On both counts, well written, it makes me think the singer DOES care... and should. It's almost like the singer wants to say "Everything... means EVERYTHING... to me." Not only does that make more logical sense, it's also a more positive foundation to build the song around. As written, it not only doesn't make sense, it also makes me wonder as reviewer/listener why I should care myself. Not the setting we're looking for to grab a listener. And all the more disappointing because, per above, the hook is so strong musically and melodically. I think the lyric needs to come up to that level.Singer's performance, and backing harmonies, are believable and strong--they will sell a stronger, more believable message in the story. Beyond that, the recording tap-dances around being acceptable broadcast quality. If there's a bass, it's too low in the mix--and a rockin' folk song like this really needs it. Drums are solid, except in the breakdown sections, where both the drummer and the band need to be a little tighter to the groove both the lead guitar and keyboard solos could be more in the pocket. I'm also hearing a fair amount of digital clicking going on--I would check the recording to make sure it's clean, and there aren't some sample rate frequency issues with the DAW.I'd love to hear Justin and the band build around a killer melodic hook with a hard look at the song/story/lyrics and recording. There's a "holy trinity" of song/singer/record going on in here--it just needs a little more work. And, as songwriters/recording artists, we all have to be willing to call a first draft a draft--and dig a little deeper to make it all undeniable. Rock on.

Quote From Pro: Probably the most captivating and enjoyable part of "Everything Is Anything" is the most important part of all: the hook. The words come out the the singer's mouth like a fusillade of gunfire notes--super-singable, memorable, repetitive, and hook'y. The fact that this is also the chorus and title of the song makes for a very promising beginning for this indie alt-folk rocker.

Everything is Anything by Justin Seegert Music

Justin Seegert Music

Broadjam Artist: Justin Seegert Music
Song: Everything is Anything

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
A.J. Gundell (Songwriter, Composer, Music Supervisor, Producer)

Pro General Comments: Probably the most captivating and enjoyable part of "Everything Is Anything" is the most important part of all: the hook. The words come out the the singer's mouth like a fusillade of gunfire notes--super-singable, memorable, repetitive, and hook'y. The fact that this is also the chorus and title of the song makes for a very promising beginning for this indie alt-folk rocker.From there, I think some deeper lyrical analysis and critique would be helpful. First, the lyric begs the question of... "okay, but, what's the point?" If the answer comes in the next line, "everything don't mean nothing to me," then my question as both reviewer and listener is--then why are you singing about it? And I don't really believe the singer, that none of this means anything. The verses say "I was cold, and you made me warm" and "I was old, and you made me young." On both counts, well written, it makes me think the singer DOES care... and should. It's almost like the singer wants to say "Everything... means EVERYTHING... to me." Not only does that make more logical sense, it's also a more positive foundation to build the song around. As written, it not only doesn't make sense, it also makes me wonder as reviewer/listener why I should care myself. Not the setting we're looking for to grab a listener. And all the more disappointing because, per above, the hook is so strong musically and melodically. I think the lyric needs to come up to that level.Singer's performance, and backing harmonies, are believable and strong--they will sell a stronger, more believable message in the story. Beyond that, the recording tap-dances around being acceptable broadcast quality. If there's a bass, it's too low in the mix--and a rockin' folk song like this really needs it. Drums are solid, except in the breakdown sections, where both the drummer and the band need to be a little tighter to the groove both the lead guitar and keyboard solos could be more in the pocket. I'm also hearing a fair amount of digital clicking going on--I would check the recording to make sure it's clean, and there aren't some sample rate frequency issues with the DAW.I'd love to hear Justin and the band build around a killer melodic hook with a hard look at the song/story/lyrics and recording. There's a "holy trinity" of song/singer/record going on in here--it just needs a little more work. And, as songwriters/recording artists, we all have to be willing to call a first draft a draft--and dig a little deeper to make it all undeniable. Rock on.

Quote From Pro: Probably the most captivating and enjoyable part of "Everything Is Anything" is the most important part of all: the hook. The words come out the the singer's mouth like a fusillade of gunfire notes--super-singable, memorable, repetitive, and hook'y. The fact that this is also the chorus and title of the song makes for a very promising beginning for this indie alt-folk rocker.

Lanterns in the Sky by Justin Seegert Music

Justin Seegert Music

Broadjam Artist: Justin Seegert Music
Song: Lanterns in the Sky

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
A.J. Gundell (Songwriter, Composer, Music Supervisor, Producer)

Pro General Comments: "Lanterns in the Sky" is a sweet, endearing heartland/acoustic contemporary folk song with strongly crafted lyrical messages, a simple memorable melody, and appropriately supportive harmonic motion. The song paints a vivid, inspiring picture of an earth mother/almost goddess woman with the charms and talents to "light lanterns in the sky, make a garden grow, craft stars and angels and help them fly." We see her and feel her powers... as well as the way that that they seduce the singer through his performance--all good, really nicely done. And again, along with the singer(s), the melody and chords lend just the right folk-Americana touch that the song and the main idea are selling.As I often reference in my Pro Reviews, I believe in the essential importance of what I call the "holy trinity" in independent music submitted for licensing: song, singer, record. In this case, I think the artist/producers have nailed the first two of three--but the last, the recording, needs work. Broadjam licensing listings, referenced below, are almost always asking for "Broadcast Quality". Home recordings are fine, we all work on our DAWs now. But records that feel like demos are not. Media clients are looking to make "all-in" song and master deals with indie artists--so the recording needs to support the song and the singer and come along with the package. If/when it doesn't, clients likely will pass.For me, "Lanterns" falls short here. The basic drum track is really well done, builds well, and is almost certainly programmed. It works but it's timed to the click of the DAW. A lot of the phrasing and performances--mostly the acoustic and lead/fill electric guitars, some of the lead singing--drifts in and out of the pocket. Mix is also a little off--electric fills too loud. Is there a bass? If not, there should be if so, it should be louder. The effect is that 'demo'y' quality I refer to. I'd just revisit these performances and tighten them up, and it should all be there. Not significant aside, I feel the addition of the female vocalist's harmonies and answers is a fantastic touch that works really well--suggesting the presence of the goddess with her voice. With these adjustments to the recording, "Lanterns in the Sky" has some real potential to interest licensing clients looking for a simple, charming Americana folk song for their projects.

Quote From Pro: "Lanterns in the Sky" is a sweet, endearing heartland/acoustic contemporary folk song with strongly crafted lyrical messages, a simple memorable melody, and appropriately supportive harmonic motion. The song has some real potential to interest licensing clients looking for a simple, charming Americana folk tune for their projects.

Lanterns in the Sky by Justin Seegert Music

Justin Seegert Music

Broadjam Artist: Justin Seegert Music
Song: Lanterns in the Sky

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
A.J. Gundell (Songwriter, Composer, Music Supervisor, Producer)

Pro General Comments: "Lanterns in the Sky" is a sweet, endearing heartland/acoustic contemporary folk song with strongly crafted lyrical messages, a simple memorable melody, and appropriately supportive harmonic motion. The song paints a vivid, inspiring picture of an earth mother/almost goddess woman with the charms and talents to "light lanterns in the sky, make a garden grow, craft stars and angels and help them fly." We see her and feel her powers... as well as the way that that they seduce the singer through his performance--all good, really nicely done. And again, along with the singer(s), the melody and chords lend just the right folk-Americana touch that the song and the main idea are selling.As I often reference in my Pro Reviews, I believe in the essential importance of what I call the "holy trinity" in independent music submitted for licensing: song, singer, record. In this case, I think the artist/producers have nailed the first two of three--but the last, the recording, needs work. Broadjam licensing listings, referenced below, are almost always asking for "Broadcast Quality". Home recordings are fine, we all work on our DAWs now. But records that feel like demos are not. Media clients are looking to make "all-in" song and master deals with indie artists--so the recording needs to support the song and the singer and come along with the package. If/when it doesn't, clients likely will pass.For me, "Lanterns" falls short here. The basic drum track is really well done, builds well, and is almost certainly programmed. It works but it's timed to the click of the DAW. A lot of the phrasing and performances--mostly the acoustic and lead/fill electric guitars, some of the lead singing--drifts in and out of the pocket. Mix is also a little off--electric fills too loud. Is there a bass? If not, there should be if so, it should be louder. The effect is that 'demo'y' quality I refer to. I'd just revisit these performances and tighten them up, and it should all be there. Not significant aside, I feel the addition of the female vocalist's harmonies and answers is a fantastic touch that works really well--suggesting the presence of the goddess with her voice. With these adjustments to the recording, "Lanterns in the Sky" has some real potential to interest licensing clients looking for a simple, charming Americana folk song for their projects.

Quote From Pro: "Lanterns in the Sky" is a sweet, endearing heartland/acoustic contemporary folk song with strongly crafted lyrical messages, a simple memorable melody, and appropriately supportive harmonic motion. The song has some real potential to interest licensing clients looking for a simple, charming Americana folk tune for their projects.