Teach Me How To Love You by William Smith

Broadjam Artist: William SmithSong: Teach Me How To Love YouBroadjam Pro Reviewer: Robert Dellaposta (Writer, A&R, Publisher)Pro General Comments: Hi William,I’ll do my best to make comments that i hope will be helpful to you. It should be every songwr…

William Smith

Broadjam Artist: William Smith
Song: Teach Me How To Love You

Broadjam Pro Reviewer:
Robert Dellaposta (Writer, A&R, Publisher)

Pro General Comments: Hi William,I'll do my best to make comments that i hope will be helpful to you. It should be every songwriters goal to say something new, unique, fresh and creative that has not been said before in thousands of songs. Using cliche's and common details and actions will not get you noticed as a creative songwriter. Take more chances and don't fall into the cliche trap that a lot of songwriters can never escape from. Cliches are easy to plug in and they work but in 99% of the time they are not the best line...they simply feel right...using cliche's is the same as plagiarism in my opinion...they are some else's original words...my advice is avoid them at all costs...rhyme is important if you want your listener to remember the words and the music. Compare your rhyme scheme in verse 1 with your rhyme scheme in verse 2...they are totally different...commercial guidelines call for rhyme schemes to match from verse to verse...opening lines set the scene...they should paint a picture in the mind of the listener that let's them know where you are...who you're with and what's going on...form is also important...it should not take you seventeen lines before your listener hears the hook. verse/chorus/verse/chorus/bridge/chorus is a very popular commercial form...i'd prefer a four line verse and a two line pre-chorus over an eight line verse...as a rule of thumb get to the hook quicker...always ask yourself as you're writing "is this a new story or has it all been said in other songs" If your answer is it's all been said before then stop and start over...be as original and creative as you can be. A bridge rarely leads to a third verse in fact most country radio hit songs only have two verses. Bridges usually always lead to the last chorus as in Verse/Chorus/verse/chorus/Bridge/chorus

Quote From Pro: William Smith is blending retro rock and Southern Rock with a Contemporary country lyric to create a hybrid genre that is enjoyable and entertaining.

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